Map Orkney Month: Imagining archaeological mappings paper published

Brendan Colvert & Rosey Priestman: Forming the pearl, Sanday 01/03/15

Map Orkney Month: Imagining archaeological mappings has just been published in a new open access online journal Livingmaps Review (Vol. 1, No. 1).

This is based on my contribution to the Public Archaeology 2015 project, in which 6 archaeologists and 6 non-archaeologists each had a month long project throughout the year.

Map Orkney Month proposes new forms of creative mapping for archaeology. When volunteers were asked to map their world for a day, the idea was to create a new collaborative map of the Orkney archipelago based on everyday journeys and places; a kind of countywide archaeological walkover survey with a twist. In the process, the project challenged traditional archaeological power structures, destabilised the way archaeological knowledge is produced by using non-specialists, and experimented with new modes of archaeological mapping. In the end, each contribution became its own map without the need for traditional archaeological cartography. In particular, the role of imagination in both traditional and experimental mappings became an important theme. Above all, mappers were challenged to think about archaeology in a new way, and in the process contributed something new to the discipline.

You can access the article free here (just register): https://www.livingmaps.review/journal/index.php/LMR/index

Norna Sinclair: Groatie Buckie beach, Stromness 12/03/15

Helga Tulloch: Feedign the sheep at Cruesbreck, North Ronaldsay 04/03/15

Rowena Baker: Rowing practice, Kirkwall Bay 15/03/15

Many thanks again to all MoM participants, James Dixon, Barbara Brayshay and Antonia Thomas.

Posted in Art and Archaeology, Contemporary Archaeology, Experimental Practice, GPS Drawings, Map Orkney Month, Mapping and Walking, Orkney, Performance, Public Archaeology 2015, Publication, Walkover survey | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Incoherent Archaeology Manifesto

Incoherent Archaeology Manifesto (draft)

(to be used or not used, adapted, edited, abandoned or recycled. Incoherent could be replaced with disjuncture)

 Archaeologies of Incoherence (disjuncture) in a digital age:

  1. Technology incoherence: digital technology will not be used. Analogue only or conversion back to analogue if digitising has already occurred.
  2. Material incoherence: materials must be reused or recycled from other projects or things. Tools and equipment must be made for purpose, mended or second-hand.
  3. Time incoherence: Archaeologies of the present/future, and/or with disjuncture to the past. Embrace non-linear time.
  4. Photographic incoherence: photography must use 35mm or medium format film, or film shot on super 8, 16mm, camera lucida or camera obscura (or other experimental techniques). Moving images using a phenakistoscope disc.
  5. Performance incoherence: all presentations about projects must be in landscape and site specific, without the use of powerpoint or digital reproduction. They must include original materials, secondary archive, photographs or objects.
  6. Archive incoherence: there can be no primary archive; it must be destroyed, reused or re-appropriated.

END

Posted in Art and Archaeology, Contemporary Archaeology, Experimental Practice | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Walking (in)visible lines: archaeologies in between – published in Flettverk #2 SCENE

We are pleased to have our article ‘Walking (in)visible lines: archaeologies in between’ published last month in a Norwegian art magazine FLETTVERK (translates as ‘product created by braiding or interlacing of different parts’). The theme for issue #2 is SCENE;  fitting for our narrative article based on collaborations between Dan Lee, Antonia Thomas and Tonje Birkeland (pictured above on the cover) over a couple of years in Orkney.

More info on the magazine website: http://tidsskriftet-flettverk.no/INNHOLD.html

Download our article here: lee-thomas-2015-walking-in-visible-lines-flettverk-2.pdf

Posted in Art and Archaeology, Contemporary Archaeology, Experimental Practice, Performance, Publication, Tonje Birkeland | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Kirkwall Grammar School S1 rapid counter mapping of the Ring of Brodgar

Check out these fantastic new maps of the Ring of Brodgar, Orkney World Heritage Site, made by Kirkwall Grammar School S1 students (all 125 of them) on 12th May 2015 on their Big Day Out. These are the results from 12 rapid counter mapping workshops with 4 GPS, run by Dan Lee (Lifelong learning & Outreach Archaeologist, UHI Archaeology Institute). The challenge was to find new sites and places (present & past) within and around the Neolithic stone circle.

My favorite new sites are: Hankie (Imaginative Recent Site Prize), Wild Ross (Natural History Prize) and Middle (Imaginative Spatial Prize)*

Thanks to KGS S1 pupils and teachers for a fun day, and HS Rangers Elaine and Sandra.

*all prizes are imaginative and do not actually exist.

Posted in Contemporary Archaeology, GPS Drawings, Mapping and Walking, Orkney | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Rackwick Survey 2015 & Archaeologies of the Old Man of Hoy

Image | Posted on by | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Landscapes of change: archaeologies of the Rousay clearances

Image | Posted on by | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Map Orkney Month final thoughts: Multi-vocal cartography and the collaborative re-imagining of place.

Public Archaeology 2015

After a month of collaborative mapping a new map of Orkney has been created. By thinking big, Map Orkney Month seems to have captured people’s imagination. Our map looks like Orkney, however it is far removed from the Ordnance Survey and the tourist trail of Neolithic World Heritage Sites, brochs and bird watching. Our map is an unfamiliar Orkney, revealed through the experience and creativity of its inhabitants.

 

Mapping was undertaken on all the main permanently inhabited islands in the archipelago, and on most days during March, often with multiple contributions per day. All the main modes of transport were included: plane, ferry, rowing boat, bus, car, push bike and walking. The imaginary and psycho-archaeological contributions from within Orkney following the journeys of photographer Gunnie Moberg, and Elsewhere including East London, Bergen – Norway, and Wei Ha Wei – China, added another level, blurring the distinctions between past and…

View original post 784 more words

Posted in Map Orkney Month | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment